Humboldt County Historical Society

Humboldt Historian

Summer 2015

HH Summer 15.jpg

Volume 63, No. 2

10 - THE LAST CLIMB - by Loni D. Hollenbeck

Fate awaits a young logger in the woods.

18 - IMPOSTORS, BLACKMAILERS, & MASQUERADERS - YOU DIDN’T HEAR IT FROM ME - by Louella Parsnips

A dancing master winds up at the center of a vortex and goes down the drain.

20 - DANIEL CAMPBELL'S CIVIL WAR - by Deborah Baskette

At the sesquicentennial of the ending of the Civil War, a soldier’s voice is heard again.

26 - CUDBEAR TO ZINGIBER - by Deborah Baskette

Secrets of the antique apothecary cabinets that serve as bookshelves in the HCHS Bookstore.

29 - THE CARSON TUNNEL - HISTORY’S MYSTERIES - by Barry Evans

A surprise Eureka tunnel to discover.

30 - A TALE OF TWO BRIDGES: TRANSPORTING LOGS AND LUMBER ACROSS THE MAD RIVER - by Jerry Rohde

A history of the Hammond Bridge.

40 - EUREKA’S WEATHER STATION & THE GREELY EXPEDITION - by Mary Dawn Cunningham

More than likely, no one in Eureka knew who the new weather station observer really was.


This issue of the Humboldt Historian opens with an article that is a bit different from the kinds of pieces normally found in these pages, even though it’s a logging story. What makes it different is its personal quality. It is the story of one man’s encounter with a singular tree. Loni Hollenbeck tells this tale of a physical and psychic struggle, and how it informed his subsequent life experiences.

As we don’t usually hear the voices of individual loggers, neither do we often hear the voices of individual soldiers. Deborah Baskette, who spent many weeks transcribing the Civil War diary of Daniel Campbell, who would settle in Kneeland, lets us see the war through one soldier’s experiences. See page 20.

We have all driven alongside the Hammond Bridge on the Mad River, and many of us have walked our dogs or ridden our bicycles across it, as well. What are its origins? What is to become of it? Jerry Rohde’s history of the Hammond Bridge begins on page 30.

Also in this issue, Barry Evans uncovers a covered railroad tunnel that once extended along the Eureka waterfront, while the mysteries that swirled around a Ferndale masquerade ball are parsed by Louella Parsnips, and the secret background of a new citizen in 1888 Eureka is deftly revealed by Mary Dawn Cunningham.
— From the Editor