Humboldt County Historical Society

Humboldt Historian

Spring 2012

HH- Spring-2012.jpg

Volume 60, No. 1

10 - AUGUSTUS JACOBY, PIONEER JEWISH MERCHANT
OF ARCATA - by Nan Abrams

Developing his business with vision and determination, Jacoby set a template for Arcata’s future as a vibrant center of activity.

22 - FAMILY TOUCHED BY THE WAR OF 1812 - by Maurice N. Davison

On their voyage to America, a family’s ship is intercepted, its course altered.

24 - SPIN DOCTORING A CENTURY AGO - THE PRESENCE OF THE PAST - by Jerry Rohde

Mug Books and the historical record.

26 - THE BURROUGHS FAMILY ON B STREET - by Karen Hendricks

The house on B Street was home to three generations of Burroughses - and their spirited escapades.

30 - THE FALK FISTICUFFS - YOU DIDN’T HEAR IT FROM ME - by Louella Parsnips

Shocking scenes in the surgery.

34 - MADRONA REST - by Barbara Canepa Saul, Jim Matthias, and John Matthias

Idyllic summers in a unique Miranda community.


Arcata’s most famous landmark building is also one of her earliest. Built in 1857 to withstand storm, fire, and even the ravages of time, Jacoby’s monolithic, vault-like storehouse must have stood out grandly among the wooden frame structures that surrounded it on the frontier-era Arcata Plaza. It would have been a huge undertaking, and Jacoby’s vision for it was big, too: a fireproof retail store plus wholesale warehouse to supply the stores in the mining districts. In bringing his vision to fruition, he would help to build the transportation infrastructure that would establish Arcata as a major point of commerce on the North Coast. Nan Abrams presents the story of Augustus Jacoby, beginning on page 10.

While Jacoby emigrated from Poland in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars, the Kirkpatrick family of Ireland set out for America right in the midst of the Napoleon Wars. More significantly, they embarked for their new country in 1812. On the day before they left, war was declared between the United States and Britain. It was definitely not a good time to be afloat on the same ocean as the British navy. Maurice Davison tells the story on page 22.

From adventures on the high seas, we will set our feet firmly on the ground again first on B Street in Eureka, and then in a cozy community in Miranda, to enjoy the pleasures of days gone by.

Also in these pages is a chance to learn about Mug Books with Jerry Rohde, and, if you are not averse to gossip, you may want to see what Louella Parsnips has dug up for you in this springtime issue of the Humboldt Historian.
— From the Editor