Humboldt County Historical Society

Humboldt Historian

Fall 2010

Cover Fall 10.jpg

Volume 58, No. 3

10 - THE LOEFFELHOLZ FAMILY IN TRINIDAD - SPEAKING OF COLLECTIONS - by Deborah Meador

When revolutions spread throughout Europe in the mid-19th century, Baron von Loeffelholz and his family found a refuge near Trinidad.

12 - EUREKA THEATERS - by Naida Olsen Gipson

Going to the movies was suffused with glamour and excitement during the Depression and the War years.

18 - HUMBOLDT COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES - by Jeremiah Scott, Jr.

Humboldt’s Superior Court Judges for the first 110 years, 1879-1990.

24 - THE HONORABLE JUDGE DON WILKIN SON, PRESIDING

The human, and humorous, side of Judge Don Wilkinson is recalled by his colleagues.

26 - TWO HILLSIDES - THE PRESENCE OF THE PAST - by Jerry Rohde

Two tales—one of a missing wooden leg, one of some mysterious grave markers—are neatly re- solved.

28 - HUMBOLDT LILIES - by Leota M. Ness, with an Introduction by David Imper

Adventures with Lilies from Tibet to Scotia and from London to Freshwater.

36 - OUR DAYS AND YEARS ON KNEELAND PRAIRIE - by Irene Paddock Ivory

Life was difficult, heartbreaking, and full of adventure for young Sterling and Irene Paddock.


Stations everyone! It is time to continue our grand tour through Humboldt history.

Our first stop: 1850s Trinidad. Baron von Loeffelholz and his family left a life of privilege in the Hapsburg Empire as revolutions spread through Europe in 1848. They found their refuge near the tiny hamlet of Trinidad. We have all been to Luffenholtz Beach, but who were the Loeffelholzes, for whom it was named? Join Deborah Meador on a journey to 19th century Trinidad, with stops in modern day Vienna, on page 10.

Time travel may stir up feelings of wistfulness. Most of us probably remember our youthful movie-going experiences in this way—how big the screen was, how the movie would cast an aura around our life for days. It may have even involved for some of us a scary criminal act: asking for a children’s ticket even though we were twelve. Naida Olsen Gipson capture perfectly the special experience of going to the movies in days gone by in her wonderfully thoughtful and humorous remembrance, “Eureka Theaters,” on page 12.

Of course, one does not need a time machine to pay a visit to Humboldt’s native lilies, now blooming on the North Coast, but before setting out, you are invited to the mid-twentieth-century gardens of Leota Ness and her father, Lee Harris, to meet each of Humboldt’s eight native lilies. Simply turn to page 28.

Also prepare to meet Humboldt County’s Superior Court judges up to 1990, introduced by Jeremiah Scott, Jr., on page 18, and don’t miss some delightful moments with Judge Wilkinson on page 24.

Let us next visit a fine and private place as Jerry Rohde guides us over two hillsides. The trip begins on page 26.

Our final destination in this issue of the Humboldt Historian is the top of Kneeland Prairie. We arrive in the early 1900s to experience the freedom and adventure, and the hard work and the losses, that await Sterling Paddock and his siblings.
— From the Editor